What is Invertebrates and what are the Examples of Invertebrates?
Invertebrates
 are animals that neither possess nor develop a vertebral column commonly known as a backbone or spine. This includes all animals apart from the subphylum Vertebrata. 
The majority of animal species are invertebrates that estimate around 97% of it. 

 

Here are some examples of Invertebrates:

Starfish or sea stars are star-shaped echinoderms belonging to the class Asteroidea. Common usage frequently finds these names being also applied to ophiuroids, which are correctly referred to as brittle stars or “basket stars”

      STAR FISH
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Sea urchins or urchins are typically spiny, globular animals, echinoderms in the class Echinoidea. About 950 species live on the seabed, inhabiting all oceans and depth zones from the intertidal to 5,000 metres. Their tests are round and spiny, typically from 3 to 10 cm across.

SEA URCHIN
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An earthworm is a tube-shaped, segmented worm found in the phylum Annelida. They are commonly found living in soil, feeding on live and dead organic matter. An earthworm’s digestive system runs through the length of its body. It conducts respiration through its skin.

EARTHWORMS
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Sponges, the members of the phylum Porifera, are a basal Metazoa clade as a sister of the diploblasts. They are multicellular organisms that have bodies full of pores and channels allowing water to circulate through them, consisting of jelly-like mesohyl sandwiched between two thin layers of cells.

SPONGE
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Jellyfish or sea jellies are the informal common names given to the medusa-phase of certain gelatinous members of the subphylum Medusozoa, a major part of the phylum Cnidaria.

Jellyfish
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Lobsters comprise a family of large marine crustaceans. Lobsters have long bodies with muscular tails, and live in crevices or burrows on the sea floor. Three of their five pairs of legs have claws, including the first pair, which are usually much larger than the others.

Lobster
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Crabs are decapod crustaceans of the infraorder Brachyura, which typically have a very short projecting “tail”, usually entirely hidden under the thorax. They live in all the world’s oceans, in fresh water, and on land, are generally covered with a thick exoskeleton and have a single pair of claws.

CRAB
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